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Hi, I'm Jaden, a professional recipe developer, food columnist and food photographer specializing in fast, fresh and easy recipes for the home cook. Most of my recipes are modern Asian! About meFast, fresh & easy recipes for the home cook.

Tuesday, May 8, 2007

Slow Cooked Salmon

Slow Cooked Salmon Recipe

If I were stuck on a deserted tropical island with an oven, this is what I would make. On a deserted tropical island, life seems to stand still, there’s no crinkly shirts to iron, no snarly traffic and most importantly, no alarm clocks or Microsoft Outlook. You’ve got time and you’ve got plenty of fish. I’m going to teach you about the magic of low ‘n slow tropical island salmon – once you try this method, you’ll never cook fish another way. Welllll….unless you want to try:

But I digress…. Low and slow is the ticket to most tender, succulent and true-to-flavor food, just like my number one favorite recipe in the whole wide world Baby Back Ribs with Asian Orange-Ginger Glaze proves.

The concept is simple

When you cook fish on high heat - the proteins immediately seize up – which is why it’s so easy to overcook fish, and end up with dry, chalky and tough piece of seafood. I mean, if you were set on a blazing hot bed of coals, you’d seize up too, screaming, “HOLY SHIT THAT’S HOT!”

Now…lets think sauna…jacuzzi…You see, gentle cooking breaks DOWN the meat, giving it a chance to relax…chill out…have a margherita….get a tan. For fish, low and slow creates the most dreamy, silky-smooth, melt in your mouth texture. And the surprise…the cooking is so gentle that the fully cooked salmon looks almost EXACTLY like it did before cooking.

Salmon before cooking….

 

Salmon cooked 250F for 25 minutes….

A little peek at the inside – yes, it looks exactly like it does pre-cooked, but it’s cooked to a silky texture.

Those purple flowers are from my Ginger Mint Herb. The lavender color is just gorgeous!


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Slow Cooked Salmon

Servings: 4 Prep Time: Cook Time:
Screen Shot 2014-02-17 at 2.39.37 PM

Ingredients:

This recipe is SO easy and lazy that I'm not even going to give you the traditional formatted recipe. Improvise, make it your own and have fun. This is truly lazy at its finest. The salmon cooks on a bed of either sliced onions, citrus or herbs - the bed serves a purpose. When you slow cook salmon, some of the proteins break down and can cook out. The bed helps any fats and proteins drain away. Plus, the fish gets gently perfumed with whatever you use for the bed4 (6 ounce) salmon fillets (1 per person)Choose ingredients below:
Seasonings
BedFinishing (after cooking, top with)
(PHOTO ABOVE) brush w/cooking oil, salt, pepper, ground coriander, top with orange slicesthin sliced oranges and onionscrushed macadamia nuts, mint
brush w/oil, salt, pepper, brown sugarsliced ginger, green scallion sectionsminced scallions
brush w/honey, salt, pepperthin sliced fennel pulbparsley, more thinly sliced fennel
(PHOTO BELOW) brush with honey, salt, peppersliced oranges, lemonssweetened coconut flakes, diced mango, papaya, red onion, golden raisins
brush with oil, salt, pepper, garlic powdersliced red onionsfresh mango salsa

Directions:

How to cook salmon low and slow

1. Preheat to 250F.  Season salmon and let sit at room temperature for 20 minutes. <- important. Otherwise the time in the oven will be devoted to un-chilling your salmon, instead of cooking it. Grab a pan big enough to hold all fillets in single layer. Make bed of whatever ingredients you've chosen.

2. Place the salmon fillets on the bed you've made. Cook for 30 minutes. [if you're cooking more than 4 fillets, just add another 2 minutes per additional filet] To test for doneness, stick a sharp paring knife in, if it goes in an out very easily, its done. Even if you leave it in the oven for an extra few minutes, don't worry, it is impossible to overcook the salmon this way....unless you, uh, leave it in the oven for a week.

3. Top with whatever finishing herbs, spices or ingredients you've chosen. After cooking, the salmon is going to look almost exactly the same as when you first put it in. Don't worry, after 30 minutes in the oven it is cooked.

If you generally like your tuna seared, or you like your salmon "medium rare" - you must try this recipe. Low and slow really does capture and deliver what the ingredients should taste like exactly. The salmon still retains all of its gorgeous color, even when fully cooked. The texture and flavor is sublime!

p.s. I found a can of spices at my local gourmet market. Its called JUNGLE BOOGIE!!! Isn't that just too cool? With a name like that, who cares what kind of spice it was, I just had to try it! <-- see, I wasn't joking! "Naturally organic. Fresh dried granulated mango, banana, pineapple, coconut, herbs, roasted garlic and roasted red/green bell peppers" Naturally, its made by a company called Bad Bone. Sadly, Bad Bone is a goner. No longer in business. :-( Someone, quick, create a spice blend with those same ingredients and sell!!! I will be your number one fan.

***

If you like this recipe, I know you’ll love:

How to transform “cheap” Choice steak into “gucci” Prime steak



84 Responses to “Slow Cooked Salmon”

  1. Nick — 2/10/10 @ 8:25 pm

    Would this work for other types of fish?

    • SteamyKitchen — 2/10/10 @ 10:20 pm

      Yes, though I really like thick, firm fish using this method. If the fish filet is thinner, cut the cooking time by a few minutes.

  2. Pingback: Cooking with Amy: A Food Blog: Slow Roasted Salmon Recipe « just4moms.net

  3. Emily — 6/15/10 @ 6:30 pm

    I stumbled on this method about a year ago, and I just wanted to tell you, this is the only way I cook salmon now. Low and slow just makes it so tender and silky. I feel spoiled. Thank you so much for sharing this.

  4. Pingback: Salmon with Coriander, Leeks, and Tangerine « Instructions For Dancing

  5. Ngoc — 6/23/10 @ 9:25 pm

    Sweet Moses. I made this (on a bed of white onions, brushed with a mustard bbq sauce) last night for salmon tostadas, and I may never go back to any other way of cooking salmon. Thank you for sharing!

  6. Charyl Watz — 6/25/10 @ 12:35 pm

    Jaden, I made your slow cooked salmon on the grill. It was delicious! Check out my version…It’s a bit different, but the friends and fam really enjoyed it. I posted it on my blog.. Thanks for the great technique.

  7. Peter Kehlet Schou — 7/18/10 @ 10:30 am

    Juicy, soft and suble, i normally grill my Salmon so it is almost raw in the core, but this is a much better way of doing it. !
    Trying your gucci prime steak today :-)

    Try the following soup recipet:
    Blend 8 lbs of ripe tomatoes to a pulp.
    using a cheese cloth let the juice drip from the pulp.
    1 tsp. salt and suggar
    on a grill skillet grill 2 scallops per serving turning the scallop 90 deg to get a nice pattern.

    in each bowl place a small pile of tomato, celery and basil and place the the grilled scallops arround it.

    Enjoy. the taste is fabolous.

    Regards from Denmark

    best regards
    Peter

  8. EricaVee — 7/22/10 @ 12:17 pm

    Made this afor my lunch at work today in the toaster oven with some random pork seasoning I found in the kitchen–it’s FANTASTIC! I have always struggled with cooking salmon to the right texture, and this is pretty much fail-proof. I had mine on a bed of fresh mizuna, yummmm. Thanks so mych for sharing!

  9. Quay Po Cooks — 10/29/10 @ 5:46 am

    How did I missed your blog? I love everything I see here.. gives me inspiration to cook more. Thanks!

  10. Toph — 12/21/10 @ 3:07 pm

    Do you recommend that the fish be cooked covered or uncovered? I tried either way to get the same coloration as you, but not getting the gorgeous rich color like in your pictures. It does taste delicious; I used a lemon-and-scallion-whites bed with a miso sake paste and it came out awesome. My grandparents now believe I can cook. Thanks!

    • SteamyKitchen — 12/21/10 @ 4:43 pm

      I think the coloration depends on the color of the fish – my salmon was really bright, deep salmon colored. I like cooking it covered with the herbs/fruit, helps keep it moist.

  11. LGA — 3/4/11 @ 1:07 pm

    Hi Jaden, I googled “slow-cooked salmon” and found your page–LOVE! I do have a quick question–I wanted to make some salmon *tonight, but preferably in the slow cooker; can these recipes above apply in the crockpot? If so, how long would you recommend [both on low or high]? Thanks Jaden!

  12. Dee_ — 7/1/11 @ 8:17 pm

    I like the idea of slow baked fish. I prefer tilapia as it has lower sodium than salmon. Place it on a bed of white onions. Delicious!

  13. kendra — 10/29/11 @ 12:29 am

    I just made this tonight with the coriander. AMAZING! This recipe will be in my regular cooking cycle.

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  15. Cori Ann Lentz — 3/30/12 @ 8:08 pm

    Yum! I can’t wait to try this with cod tonight! I’m on a strict fitness model diet and I am so excited by your recipes! Not only do they look and sound amazing…. but you’re wit and hilarious sense of humor gives them even more flavor. :) Thanks for making such an awesome blog! :)

  16. Cori Ann Lentz — 3/30/12 @ 8:09 pm

    You’re = your. :) Auto correct struck.

  17. Athena — 4/4/12 @ 11:30 am

    I followed the guidelines and cooked six salmon fillets in 250f oven for 30 minutes. The fish was a bit overlooked.
    Anyhow, I think it’s the best way to cook salmon fillet.

  18. Debbie — 4/13/12 @ 7:43 pm

    made this tonight with Mahi-Mahi. It was fantastic. Like other’s have said i’ll never cook fish any other way.

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  20. ross — 5/10/12 @ 2:28 am

    I like this idea.

    I’m thinking that I could do it in a Traeger set to 250 but I was thinking of having it sit on a fennel bed. As I love whole fish I thought that I could simply cut steak widths almost down to the backbone leaving it intact.
    That way when it’s cooked I could slide off a portion onto each person’s plate leaving most of the bones behind. Do you think that would work?

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  22. Suety — 8/15/12 @ 10:24 pm

    Hi Jayden! So here’s the thing. I’ve been following another recipe for slow-cooked salmon for months. I was looking for other variations, came across this article and I realised that you’ve been plagiarised!! The writer changed it up quite a bit but I think it’s still really obvious. I don’t know if anyone has pointed it out to you yet so I just thought I’d let you know. Here’s the recipe:
    http://simplygluten-free.com/blog/2010/09/slow-roasted-salmon.html

    Yours still looks much more pro though. I love the addition of flowers. Thanks for the recipe!

  23. susghost017 — 8/27/12 @ 9:25 pm

    We loved this recipe! Friends brought us fresh caught Columbia River salmon and I was looking for a new idea. Your recipe was PERFECT! I followed the option with the oranges and onions, substituting shallots for the onions because I was out of onions. You were right the fish came out perfectly done – I hate overcooked dry fish – eventhough some of the pieces were of unequal size.

    Thank you so much. This is my new go to fish recipe. If I can cook prime rib at 250*, why not fish/

  24. ross — 11/6/12 @ 5:10 pm

    I finally got this to work on a whole side on a Traeger by setting it to 180 and putting in a temperature probe.

    According to my info it should be about 107-112 when finished and that’s when I pulled it out. Damn brilliant result.

    It wasn’t piping hot but is perfect for a lazy summer afternoon barby. Cold is great the next day with a mustard-yogurt or horseradish mayo dressing.

  25. Thanks for the recipe! — 11/24/12 @ 10:07 pm

    Thanks for sharing. Really simple recipe. Bon Appetit!

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  29. Hanni — 6/1/14 @ 3:48 pm

    Oops, my fish cooked too much, it turned brown (I used tuna) instead of the beautiful raw fish color. What did I do wrong? Should it not have been sealed in foil? Thanks!

  30. Blair — 9/15/14 @ 9:25 pm

    I never cook fish, but for a birthday request I used your recipe to cook salmon. I did two different pans: one with a bed of yellow onions and one with a bed of red onions. We both agreed the red onions gave it more flavor and topped with a papaya, red onion, mint salsa it was no-fail and great!

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